PopKrazy Store PopKrazy Guide
to Pop
Culture

November 2009

Here you can step back through the vortex of time to view old PopKrazy content. Pages, Podcasts, Polls, and Stories will appear here.

GREAT MOMENTS IN TV HISTORY #1

On April 9, 1988, on "Dolly," a variety program for the whole family, the irreverent Jerry Lee sang "Meat Man" for his hostess with the mostest.

He leered, and she did not conceal her cleavage, and God saw that it was good

 

Jerry Lee's cousin, Rev. Jimmy Lee Swaggart, was not present at this momentous event, but he was there in spirit--eating his heart out.

Jerry Lee Lewis looking mean on album cover

Images courtesy of the POPKRAZY TRASH HEAP



QUENTIN TARANTINO VS. RUSS MEYER

Quentin Tarantino's Death Proof movie poster

Death Proof, a masterpiece of exploiting exploitation films as the second film in the Grindhouse experience



STREAM-OF-CONSCIOUSNESS SCREAMIN' JAY

 

Screamin' Jay Hawkins was a  weird dude, maybe crazy to boot. 

(If you click on the above links, you'll discover how is wild mind worked.)

Image courtesy of Salon.com

 

 



DON'T LOOK BACK (or, JOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF YOUR MINDS

Anybody remember the infamously snide take on the Velvet Underground? You know, everyone who bought their records must have started or joined a band, considering every other hipster band named them as a chief influence, yet no one really bought their records. (I guess the same thing could apply to the Replacements or the Pixies, except they weren’t quite so influential, and certainly not as consistently great.)

Of course a true rock snob like myself bought and devoured their five releases, ‘cept I started with 1970’s Loaded after hearing “Rock and Roll” on local college free form FM radio (Brown University’s WBRU to be exact) sometime during my teen daze, and once I spotted the first album (with the, gulp, banana cover) at the catalog-deep record shop I dug down enough into my coin and dust filled pockets to buy that, with the others soon following. (Yeah, yeah, yeah I bought backwards, but I still BOUGHT.)



MOON MAN: ONCEUPONATIME TV'S GREAT ICON OF HOPE

In the late '70s, disco video was all the rage. TV programs such as Kicks, Hot City, and Soap Factory Disco marred the broadcast airwaves. As long as folks held the desire to celebrate their beautiful brawn on the set of some sleazy soundstage, the ecstasy prevailed and became perfect visual wallpaper for the winking TV eye.

But for sheer spunk, no disco program ever approached Moon Man Connection which I first experienced on UHF Channel 20 in Washington DC. This low-cost program was visual wallpaper so extreme that its very insubstantiality became hypnotic.